My Father’s Family — Part 6

On January 1, 1919 the military handed over the keys of cinema “Eden” back to Abarbanel who hastened to renew his contracts with the film agents in Alexandria and Beirut. Throughout 1919 and 1920 the movie-house operated at full steam. The inhabitants of Tel-Aviv and Jaffa came back and the military continued to come to…

My Father’s Family — Part 5

1916 was no better than its predecessor. The citizens of the Allied Powers have all gone to Egypt by the end of 1914 but even citizens of the Axis powers started leaving and moving north. 1917 came and made things worse. The British opened a forceful front north of the Suez Canal.Mostly Australian, New-Zealand and…

My Father’s Family — Part 4

Abarbanel was a very vigorous man. The members of the committee were clever men who wanted to develop their town and were yearning for culture and amusement. They held a closed meeting and decided to give Abarbanel a concession to build a movie-house. He was asked again to a Committee session during which, in short…

My Father’s Family — Part 3

In May 1911 Moshe Abarbanel took both his sons: Haim and Zeev and traveled south to Odessa. There they took a ship and departed for Jaffa. With a stop at Beirut the voyage took just over a fortnight. From the port of Jaffa they drove with a one-horse coach and an Arab coachman to Tel-Aviv…

My Father’s Family — Part 2

Time passed and Moshe Abarbanel grew up and received an excellent education, which was different from the education received by most Jewish children at that time for after spending his early years at the Jewish Heder he was sent to the municipal school of Lyozna and in addition to that his father engaged a private…

My Father’s Family — Part 1

Towards the end of the 18th century there lived in Nîmes, France, a Jew by the name of Jacob Abravanel. He was a Sephardi Jew and a clothier trading in cloth for all and various uses. He was recently married to a Sephardi Jewess. The people of the small Jewish congregation of Nîmes and its…